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BigID pulls in $14 million Series A to help identify private customer data across big data stores

BigID pulls in $14 million Series A to help identify private customer data across big data stores
From TechCrunch - January 29, 2018

As data privacy becomes an increasingly important notion, especially withthe EUs GDPR privacy laws coming online in May, companies need to find ways to understand their customers private data. BigID thinks it has a solution and it landed a $14 million Series A investment today to help grow the idea.

Comcast Ventures, SAP (via SAP.io), ClearSky Security Fund and one of the companys seed round investors, BOLDstart Ventures, all participated in the investment. The deal closed last week. Todays investment on top of the $2.1 million seed roundin 2016 brings the total raised to $16.1 million.

CEO and co-founder Dimitri Sirota says before companies can do anything with their data, they have to understand what they have. The starting point therefore is creating a catalogue of private data types you need to protect without actually moving the data.

Think of us as Google for data. We index the information, figure out what information belongs to what entity, the data subject [and so forth], but its all virtual. We dont copy it. It stays wherever it was, Sirota explained.

The company can search across multiple big data stores, find private information for individuals across different sources, map the relationships across sources, see how data flows across different geographies and help customers comply with local data privacy regulations.

And he says the solution supports a variety of data formats out of the box whether thats MongoDB, Cassandra, a cloud service like AWS or Azure or an enterprise software package like SAP. It also provides a generic connector that customers can customize to connect to unsupported data stores. It typically takes a couple of weeks to add a new one. BigID is also constantly working on expanding supported data types and updates the product on a regular basis, according to Sirota.

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