Advertisement

Twitter details how it reviews and enforces rules around hate speech, violence and harassment

Twitter details how it reviews and enforces rules around hate speech, violence and harassment
From TechCrunch - November 14, 2017

Twitter has been under fire lately (slash always) for its methods to deal with harassment and abuse on its platform. In an effort to provide some insight into its thinking, Twitter has added some new articles to its help center that detail how the company reviews and enforces rules, as well as the factors it considers in its decision-making process.

In a subtopic on legitimate public interest, for example, Twittersays it wants to ensure people can see all sides of an issue. With that in mind, there may be the rare occasion when we allow controversial content or behavior which may otherwise violate our Rules to remain on our service because we believe there is a legitimate public interest in its availability.

In determining if a piece of content could be of legitimate interest to the public, Twitter says it looks at the source of the content, its potential impact on the public and the availability of counterpoints.

If the Tweet does have the potential to impact the lives of large numbers of people, the running of a country (emphasis TCs), and/or it speaks to an important societal issue then we may allow the the content to remain on the service, Twitter explains.

Twitter does not explicitly mention President Donald Trump, but my bet is that this is how Trump is able to do essentially whatever he wants to do on Twitter. The help article goes on to describe that the content of some people, groups and organizations may be considered a topic of legitimate public interest by virtue of their being in the public consciousness.

The explanation on what counts as legitimate public interest lives inside Twitters new help section article, Our approach to policy development and enforcement philosophy. In that article, Twitter lays out its policy development process, enforcement philosophy and its range of enforcement options.

Advertisement

Continue reading at TechCrunch »